Hallelujah, Happy Easter

resurrection

Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, walked on Earth, teaching and healing and demonstrating for all of us the essence of Love.

And for this, He was captured, tortured and murdered in the most gruesome fashion imaginable. He was made to suffer more than any person before or since. It was the greatest crime in the history of humanity; the created slaughtered the Creator, and He offered no resistance. But this tragedy led to the ultimate triumph: He rose from the dead, conquered sin and opened up the gates of Heaven.

Before He ascended, He entrusted the Truth of human salvation to a small band of poor, simple, ordinary men. He told them to travel throughout the land and preach the Gospel. He promised them persecution, suffering, and death, and they received it. He also promised them eternal salvation and happiness, and they received it.

The Christians, the converts to Christ, met and worshipped in caves and basements. They were sought and murdered; a reality they embraced when they accepted His Word. Yet, in the face of incredible odds, in less than 300 years they peacefully conquered the most powerful empire on Earth. That feat alone is enough to convert anyone who considers it with an honest mind and an open heart.

No religion has accomplished what Christianity has accomplished. No ideology. No school of thought. No idea, no government, no political system. Nobody else, nothing else has ever lit the world on fire like the Gospel.

Soon, Christ’s message would make it to every corner of the world, and it would be the driving force of civilization for two thousand years. Christians would go where nobody else would go, and serve those who nobody else would serve, and win souls that nobody else could win.

Christianity is diversity. It speaks to all kinds of people, and fits into the totality of the human experience. It isn’t broad like a sitcom is broad, but it isn’t narrow like an alley or a political party is narrow. It’s deep, it’s universal. It meets us where we are, and lifts us to a better place.

We Christians are soldiers in a cosmic struggle, and the war is still raging. Many have died in the flesh, or much worse, in the spirit.

Governments and kingdoms of men have tried to exterminate the Truth, but all have failed. Christianity is a religion of peace and love, but it’s also a warrior’s faith. It isn’t a blanket to hide under, it’s a battle flag to march under. It doesn’t hide us from the pain and suffering that this world has to offer — it commands us to endure it, confront it, and find the beauty in it all.

Easter reminds us that there is an end to the suffering and a purpose in the pain. Jesus Christ rose from the dead. He triumphed over evil. And He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead.

This is what I believe, and I am not ashamed.

Hallelujah. Amen.

Happy Easter, everyone.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

294 Responses to Hallelujah, Happy Easter

  1. Cathie Goodman says:

    AMEN, Matt this so true and yes he has risen and is coming back. Love this and will copy it and frame it and up it to where everyone can read it. You and your family have a wonderful Easter.

  2. sheldon says:

    I always enjoy reading your posts. Happy Easter. Let us all Remember the reason for this holiday, it’s #BecauseofHim

    [video src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/mormon-media/Because-of-Him.mp4" /]

  3. Bill says:

    And the flock of sheep again follow you going baa, baa, baa, you are such a nice guy, baa, baa, baa. Religious beliefs are, or should be, very personal – or is that a dumb way to think?

    • Beth says:

      Why should religious beliefs be “very personal” (which implies not telling anyone about them)? If you really believe something, it will and should strongly influence the entire rest of your life – your political opinions, your lifestyle choices, your actions, etc. If your religious beliefs don’t mean that much to you, then you probably don’t really “believe” them at all.

  4. Abigail says:

    This is a beautiful video about the Savior and his sacrifice so that we may be forgiven and continually seek to be like him.
    http://easter.mormon.org/?cid=HPTU041514694

  5. Lori says:

    Happy Resurrection Day–he is risen indeed! Hallelujah!

  6. Ronda Wintheiser says:

  7. Jillocity says:

    Grace and mercy poured out on all who believe in His name…Praise God! A Blessed Easter to you and your family, Matt.

  8. Catherine Pickel says:

    Amen and Happy Easter! Thank you for your blog.

  9. Sandy says:

    He is risen indeed!

  10. marycatelli says:

    A blessed Easter to one and all!

  11. Joseph says:

    Happy Easter, everybody! Especially to you and your family, Matt.

  12. DoubleThink is an up and coming blog that is extremely satisfying for every kind of a person, be it the thinker, the optimist, the pessimist, the poet, the musician, the couch-potato, the bookworm or the photographer.We are a bunch of people with different backgrounds, contradictory opinions but one voice. And this blog is our voice.
    Come hear us at :
    http://doublethinkhub.wordpress.com/

  13. The anti-feminist feminine. says:

    “And this is life eternal, that they might know thee, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou has sent.”
    St John 17:3
    Happy Easter!

  14. Mel says:

    He is risen indeed! Happy Easter!

  15. Old AF Sarge says:

    May the Blessings of our sweet Lord be showered upon you and yours Matt. A beautiful message. He is risen indeed!

  16. Brendan says:

    Happy Easter, Matt. Thanks for not being afraid to take a stand on what is right and true.

  17. Pingback: Hallelujah, Happy Easter |

  18. aahughes says:

    Watch this great video “Because of Him” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_S3TI4bYerU

  19. Andy Cook says:

    Only problem is, you’re either a day early, or two days late.
    Not sure if many of you have looked at a calendar lately, but Friday evening +3 days does not equal Sunday morning. Nor does Friday evening + 3 days equal Sunday in any manner.
    I think any logical, rational adult would agree that 3 days in the bible are 3 days. No more, no less. If you actually count 3 days from the night Jesus was put in the tomb, assuming it was a Friday night, it would have been sometime on Monday, (though probably Monday night, given the Hebrew calendar the writers of the Gospels would have actually been using) that Jesus rose from the dead.

    That’s assuming that it was a regular sabbath that is being referred to when it says that “it was the preparation day for the sabbath” when it talks about the people wanting the bodies taken down, just before they broke the legs of the two criminals. Most likely what was being referred to was the day of Passover, since it was regarded as a Sabbath, regardless of what day of the week it fell on. If it were this year, it would have been Friday, either at sunrise or sunset, depending on how you interpret the Hebrew.

    Either way, it wasn’t on Easter that Jesus rose from the grave. That was something else entirely that was already being observed by the pagans.

    Jesus rose 3 days after Passover. This year, as I mentioned before, that would have been sometime on Friday.

    That is all.

    • Sarah says:

      He rose on the third day. Friday, Saturday, Sunday. There are various explanations you can read by learned historians who will explain how the Jews of Jeses’ time counted the days, and how they started with the current day.

      • Andy Cook says:

        Even if we build our doctrine on the possibility of Messiah being crucified in CE 30 (which is incontrovertible for our purposes) and if we agree that He did rise from the grave on the following sunday, there is still a major flaw in the logic used to support celebrating this act on Easter.

        All pagan origins aside, Passover is always on the Full moon. Always. This is because God’s calendar as prescribed in Exodus consists of months that follow the Moon’s rotation around the earth. So Passover is always on the Full moon in the Hewbrew month of Nisan (Nisan 15 is the actual date). When is easter celebrated? The first sunday, after the first full moon after the spring equinox (this date, no matter which calendar is used, changes from year to year, just as any celebration would that is specific to a week day, rather than the date, it’s just simple inevitability).

        Regardless of what day Messiah was resurrected, which of you celebrates their birthday on the second tuesday of every March (or whatever day of the week it was in a particular week of the month)? My birthday is not the Second thursday in March of every year, but it is March 8. I certainly don’t hold that my birthday is the 2nd thursday after the full moon. That would cause it to change dates wildly every year. Sure, it would coincide sometimes, but if the actual purpose behind easter is to recognize the day that our Savior brought Himself back to life from being dead, why do we so carelessly approximate the date or day? Who in their right mind would throw a party in honor of the coronation of a King a full 3 days before or after the actual date due to being on the wrong calendar? Wouldn’t that king end your life for dishonoring him in that way?
        Why do we do that for our king?
        It really doesn’t matter what day of the week He rose from the dead. I have no problem with it if it was Sunday. But the fact remains that we should be so careful as to honor that day on the actual date every year, and not mix it in with the pagan fertility ritual of easter simply because “he rose on a sunday, so we honor it on a sunday.”

    • Matt(Not Walsh) says:

      Which if you know about the Jewish religion, Passover has a 2 day Sabbath. Which means that he would have been taken off the cross just before sunset on a Thursday. Thursday+3 = ??? Sunday, that’s right.

      • Andy Cook says:

        No, there is technically only one day to Passover to begin with, but traditionally it’s celebrated all the following week, along with the Feast of Unleavened bread. Unleavened bread has two Sabbaths, the first day (day after Passover unless I’m mistaken, it’s happened before :P) and the last day (the same weekday of the following week)
        Passover being on a Thursday would mean that year there would be two Sabbaths in a row, but that doesn’t constitute a two day Sabbath, because, like this year, if Passover falls on a Tuesday, Wednesday is a sabbath, and then the next actual sabbath falls on Saturday, the true sabbath.

        Thursday night plus 3 full days equals Sunday night, if you count it as 3-24 hour days. That would put the 3rd day as being Sunday night, or technically Monday.

        But again, that’s ignoring the fact by the time Messiah was put into the tomb, it was already evening, i.e. Friday. So Friday (after sunset Thursday) plus 3 days = ??? Monday, that’s right.

      • Andy Cook says:

        Exodus 12:15-16
        “Seven days you shall eat unleavened bread. On the first day you shall remove leaven out of your houses, for if anyone eats what is leavened, from the first day until the seventh day, that person shall be cut off from Israel. On the first day you shall hold a holy assembly, and on the seventh day a holy assembly. No work shall be done on those days. But what everyone needs to eat, that alone may be prepared by you”

        • Passover actualyy started on Monday, April 14th, at sundown this year. Most Christian celebrations don’t even try to follow the Jewish calendar anyway, so it’s irrelevant to try to get them to line up. BTW, I think we should spend more time observing the feasts of the Lord found in the Bible than man-made holidays like Christmas and Easter. There are certain times and places that have been appointed as special to God. I don’t know why, but they are. Those are when and where He likes to do things. And shouldn’t we be concerned with His Way over our ways?

        • Andy Cook says:

          Thank you!
          Yes, my family and I enjoyed a wonderful Seder last Monday night in honor of such a glorious and miraculous event that God has invited us to celebrate with Him!

      • Andy Cook says:

        Even if we build our doctrine on the possibility of Messiah being crucified in CE 30 (which is incontrovertible for our purposes) and if we agree that He did rise from the grave on the following sunday, there is still a major flaw in the logic used to support celebrating this act on Easter.

        All pagan origins aside, Passover is always on the Full moon. Always. This is because God’s calendar as prescribed in Exodus consists of months that follow the Moon’s rotation around the earth. So Passover is always on the Full moon in the Hewbrew month of Nisan (Nisan 15 is the actual date). When is easter celebrated? The first sunday, after the first full moon after the spring equinox (this date, no matter which calendar is used, changes from year to year, just as any celebration would that is specific to a week day, rather than the date, it’s just simple inevitability).

        Regardless of what day Messiah was resurrected, which of you celebrates their birthday on the second tuesday of every March (or whatever day of the week it was in a particular week of the month)? My birthday is not the Second thursday in March of every year, but it is March 8. I certainly don’t hold that my birthday is the 2nd thursday after the full moon. That would cause it to change dates wildly every year. Sure, it would coincide sometimes, but if the actual purpose behind easter is to recognize the day that our Savior brought Himself back to life from being dead, why do we so carelessly approximate the date or day? Who in their right mind would throw a party in honor of the coronation of a King a full 3 days before or after the actual date due to being on the wrong calendar? Wouldn’t that king end your life for dishonoring him in that way?
        Why do we do that for our king?
        It really doesn’t matter what day of the week He rose from the dead. I have no problem with it if it was Sunday. But the fact remains that we should be so careful as to honor that day on the actual date every year, and not mix it in with the pagan fertility ritual of easter simply because “he rose on a sunday, so we honor it on a sunday.”

    • Desert Rat says:

      “I think any logical, rational adult would agree that 3 days in the bible are 3 days.” Only if one is ignorant of the conventions of Jewish and early Christian forms of writing and relating time. “The third day,” “in three days,” “after three days,” and “three days and three nights” are all used to indicate the equivalent passage of time.

      Jesus Himself used this mode of reckoning time, in Luke 13:32 ‘Behold, I cast out demons and perform cures today and tomorrow, and the third day I reach My goal.’ He spoke this on a Friday, exactly one week before His death. He then entered Jerusalem on the following Sunday. So, Friday through Sunday, although less than a literal 72 hours, is described by Jesus as three days.

      The early Church Fathers, who were closer in time to the actual events than some dude on the Internet, knew this as well:

      250 AD IGNATIUS: “On the day of the preparation, then, at the third hour, He received the sentence from Pilate, the Father permitting that to happen; at the sixth hour He was crucified; at the ninth hour He gave up the ghost; and before sunset He was buried. During the Sabbath He continued under the earth in the tomb in which Joseph of Arimathaea had laid Him. At the dawning of the Lord’s day He arose from the dead, according to what was spoken by Himself, “As Jonah was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly, so shall the Son of man also be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.” The day of the preparation, then, comprises the passion; the Sabbath embraces the burial; the Lord’s Day contains the resurrection.” The (Epistle of Ignatius to the Trallians, chapter 9)

      150AD JUSTIN: “But Sunday is the day on which we all hold our common assembly, because it is the first day on which God, having wrought a change in the darkness and matter, made the world; and Jesus Christ our Saviour on the same day rose from the dead. For He was crucified on the day before that of Saturn (Saturday); and on the day after that of Saturn, which is the day of the Sun, having appeared to His apostles and disciples, He taught them these things, which we have submitted to you also for your consideration.” (First apology of Justin, Weekly Worship of the Christians, Ch 68)

      • Andy Cook says:

        Not sure who those guys are. I’m assuming you’re catholic, which explains why you’re so willing to admit that everything in the Catholic church is based on planets, stars, and other pagan gods, yet still somehow imagine that God is okay with that.

        Thanks for the read tho!

        But all jokes aside, I’m not necessarily denying it wasn’t a full 72 hour period from the burial to the resurrection, but if you take into consideration the fact that Messiah was put into the tomb after Sunset, it was technically ALREADY THE NEXT DAY according to the Jewish calendar (you know, the one that the Creator of the universe put in place). I.e. Saturday, if you want to believe it was a friday when He was buried. With this fact in hand, even if Messiah rose before a full 72 hours had gone by, and it was simply a matter of “buried one day, a full day went by, the next day at sunrise he rose,” given the Hebrew calendar and the start of the day beginning at sundown the night before, it still would have been monday, because Saturday was the first day. If He rose on sun-god-worship-day, that would have only been 1 day, no matter how you interpret “day.”

        Like I told the guy below, If nothing else, it’s widely accepted that Messiah was crucified sometime between 30-33 CE, which translates to 3790-3793 in the Hebrew Calendar. If you look at the websites I’ll link to below, you’ll see that on all four of those years, Passover fell on Thursday, Tuesday, Tuesday, and Saturday, in successively. Even if it was just that the calendar page was flipped twice, and not necessarily a 72 hour span of time, the calendar would have already been flipped when He was put into the grave on “friday” night.

        Given your interpretation of “3 days,” I doubt you actually believe that it means “Passover” when it says that it was the night before Passover when Messiah held what is known today as the Last Supper; therefore, when Messiah was executed the next day, it was on Passover (which made Him our Passover lamb). There’s no other way in which “Passover” can be interpreted in the scriptures.

        No matter how you distort the math, whether you add 2 full days or 3 from the evening when Messiah was put in the tomb, there is no scenario in which He rose from the grave on a sunday. Even if you go back to 29 CE, Passover was on a sunday, which would put the resurrection — by actual grammatical interpretation — on wednesday, or by your calculations, Tuesday.
        (http://www.rosettacalendar.com or http://www.hebcal.com/converter/?hd=15&hm=Nisan&hy=3789&h2g=1)

        • littlehouseofpenguins says:

          If Jesus died on Friday, then he was laid in the tomb also on Friday, as it was before sunset (they were anxious to get him into the tomb before sunset on Friday, as once sunset occurred, it would be Sabbath day). He was therefore buried on Friday, and the three days are Friday, Saturday, Sunday (Sunday begins after sunset on Saturday, so by the time the sun rose, it was well into Sunday).

        • Andy Cook says:

          See my most recent comment.

        • Andy Cook says:

          But again, that’s only if.
          I have no problem with it being Sunday when He rose, but the fact is he rose 3 days after Passover. If you look at the link I included previously, there’s only one year out of a highly unlikely span of 5 in which the resurrection could presumably occur on Sunday. Most people think it was closer to 33 CE when he was Crucified. It would have had to be more like 30 CE if it was Sunday when he rose.

          Doesn’t matter what day of the week, but the date in the (Hebrew) month is what is important.

        • littlehouseofpenguins says:

          Actually, most people think it was probably about 4-6 BC when he was born, which would make it something like 27-29 AD when he was crucified. This is based on Herod, Pontius Pilate, and the like. The man who figured out the whole AD/BC system did his best to try to line it up with the birth of Christ, but most people think he was a few years off.

        • Andy Cook says:

          I don’t doubt that.
          And again, even if it was a Sunday when He rose, that’s not what I have a problem with. The day itself is not evil in any way.
          Read that last comment of mine before this one.

        • Meredith says:

          Who cares??? This thread of yours is ridiculous. Jesus suffered and died for us, then rose from the grave so that we all might as well. That’s the freaking point.

        • Andy Cook says:

          Yeah but He didn’t do it on the pagan day of fertility.
          I’m pretty sure He cares. It’s that kind of “who cares” attitude that is helping to destroy the church. And no, the point is honoring our king. Celebrating satanic holidays in His name does the exact opposite.

        • Meredith says:

          Respectfully, Andy, you are wrong. Honoring the King on the day He died for me and the day He rose IS honoring our King. THAT is what I believe He cares about….the intent of the heart, not the legalism of which day. That is in part why Jesus came, to do away with that kind of legalism that distracts from true worship. Furthermore, if what you say about honoring What Jesus did on the cross and from the grave is on some satanic holiday, then what better way to reject Satan on his holiday?

        • Andy Cook says:

          Reject satan….by observing his holiday?
          Interesting. Sounds like repurposing rather than avoiding. You really think that simply taking the days and traditions from the satanistic rituals and saying “it’s for Jesus” doesn’t make satan happy? God said to not take after the heathens and their ways. If you do what Solomon did and simply repurpose them instead of destroying them, you’re giving satan the victory by disobeying God.

          He came to redeem us from our sins. He didn’t come to do away with anything aside from the slavery to sin.

          Good! Honor the King on the day He rose! This year, that day was on Thursday.

        • Meredith says:

          And if it was Thursday, and I knew about it I would have celebrated then, too. But I suppose my point is that those of us who celebrate with the masses, our hearts to God were in the right place, and He knows it. So all is well.

        • Andy Cook says:

          Good.
          Well, now you know. The responsibility now lies on your shoulders.

      • Andy Cook says:

        Even if we build our doctrine on the possibility of Messiah being crucified in CE 30 (which is incontrovertible for our purposes) and if we agree that He did rise from the grave on the following sunday, there is still a major flaw in the logic used to support celebrating this act on Easter.

        All pagan origins aside, Passover is always on the Full moon. Always. This is because God’s calendar as prescribed in Exodus consists of months that follow the Moon’s rotation around the earth. So Passover is always on the Full moon in the Hewbrew month of Nisan (Nisan 15 is the actual date). When is easter celebrated? The first sunday, after the first full moon after the spring equinox (this date, no matter which calendar is used, changes from year to year, just as any celebration would that is specific to a week day, rather than the date, it’s just simple inevitability).

        Regardless of what day Messiah was resurrected, which of you celebrates their birthday on the second tuesday of every March (or whatever day of the week it was in a particular week of the month)? My birthday is not the Second thursday in March of every year, but it is March 8. I certainly don’t hold that my birthday is the 2nd thursday after the full moon. That would cause it to change dates wildly every year. Sure, it would coincide sometimes, but if the actual purpose behind easter is to recognize the day that our Savior brought Himself back to life from being dead, why do we so carelessly approximate the date or day? Who in their right mind would throw a party in honor of the coronation of a King a full 3 days before or after the actual date due to being on the wrong calendar? Wouldn’t that king end your life for dishonoring him in that way?
        Why do we do that for our king?
        It really doesn’t matter what day of the week He rose from the dead. I have no problem with it if it was Sunday. But the fact remains that we should be so careful as to honor that day on the actual date every year, and not mix it in with the pagan fertility ritual of easter simply because “he rose on a sunday, so we honor it on a sunday.”

    • stevent92 says:

      According to Jewish Law, being in the grave, if even for 15 minutes counts as 1 day. Same thing with a night. The Jewish audience to whom this was written and spoken would have known and understood this.

      Biblical context is important in this matter, and it lines up perfectly with Exodus 12 in the foreshadowing of the Passover timeframe.

      And the gospels clearly state that “on the first day of the week” which would have been Sunday. They did not have their timeframes messed-up. It must be understood in context of 1st Century Palestine, not 21st Century America.

      • Andy Cook says:

        Where in “Jewish Law” does it say that? Scripture reference please, I don’t consider Talmud to be authoritative over the Written Torah. Yes, Messiah kept some of the Oral Torah, but there’s no indication to say that by “3 days” either Messiah or YHVH intended the audience to infer “15 minutes or so on at least one of the days.” If that’s the case, was the world created in 90 minutes? Or was it spread out over 6 days? Let’s keep to the literal translation here.
        Plus, it seems highly unlikely that God “forgot” to make it plain for christians to understand the supposedly cryptic Jewish messages of the Bible. Surely our Creator would have taken into account the way that “3 days” is interpreted by the majority of the readers of Scripture.
        Also, “dawning toward the first day of the week” could also be understood to mean saturday night, for that matter.

        If nothing else, it’s widely accepted that Messiah was crucified sometime between 30-33 CE, which translates to 3790-3793 in the Hebrew Calendar. If you look at this website I’ll link to below, you’ll see that on all four of those years, Passover fell on Thursday, Tuesday, Tuesday, and Saturday, in succession. Even if you only translate “3 days” to mean “about 15 minutes or so, or just do like so many and say “3 days from friday would have been sunday” and take the approximately 2 full days that that actually translates to, 2 full days from thursday is Saturday; 2 days from tuesday is Thursday, and two days from Saturday is monday.

        Given your interpretation of “3 days,” I doubt you actually believe that it means “Passover” when it says that it was the night before Passover when Messiah held what is known today as the Last Supper. Regardless, that is what it says, and there’s no other way in which “Passover” can be interpreted in the scriptures.

        No matter how you distort the math, whether you add 2 full days or 3 from the evening when Messiah was put in the tomb, there is no scenario in which He rose from the grave on a sunday. Even if you go back to 29 CE, Passover was on a sunday, which would put the resurrection — by actual grammatical interpretation — on wednesday, or by your calculations, Tuesday.
        (http://www.rosettacalendar.com or http://www.hebcal.com/converter/?hd=15&hm=Nisan&hy=3789&h2g=1)

        Lastly, there wasn’t a “Palestine” in the Bible, nor is there today, nor will there ever be. If you’re aiming for political correctness on that issue, don’t waste my time.

        • littlehouseofpenguins says:

          When you say Passover was Thursday/Tuesday/Saturday, is that night, or day? Jewish days starting at sundown, of course. Passover on a Thursday night fits perfectly. The meal is after sundown, then the next morning, Friday morning, he was crucified. He died Friday, and rose Sunday.

        • Andy Cook says:

          Time of day is irrelevant to passover being Thursday that year, if it was. The Seder meal would have been eaten Wednesday night, the night before. Yeshua was crucified on Passover, not the day after. So no, it still doesn’t fit.

      • Andy Cook says:

        Even if we build our doctrine on the possibility of Messiah being crucified in CE 30 (which is incontrovertible for our purposes) and if we agree that He did rise from the grave on the following sunday, there is still a major flaw in the logic used to support celebrating this act on Easter.

        All pagan origins aside, Passover is always on the Full moon. Always. This is because God’s calendar as prescribed in Exodus consists of months that follow the Moon’s rotation around the earth. So Passover is always on the Full moon in the Hewbrew month of Nisan (Nisan 15 is the actual date). When is easter celebrated? The first sunday, after the first full moon after the spring equinox (this date, no matter which calendar is used, changes from year to year, just as any celebration would that is specific to a week day, rather than the date, it’s just simple inevitability).

        Regardless of what day Messiah was resurrected, which of you celebrates their birthday on the second tuesday of every March (or whatever day of the week it was in a particular week of the month)? My birthday is not the Second thursday in March of every year, but it is March 8. I certainly don’t hold that my birthday is the 2nd thursday after the full moon. That would cause it to change dates wildly every year. Sure, it would coincide sometimes, but if the actual purpose behind easter is to recognize the day that our Savior brought Himself back to life from being dead, why do we so carelessly approximate the date or day? Who in their right mind would throw a party in honor of the coronation of a King a full 3 days before or after the actual date due to being on the wrong calendar? Wouldn’t that king end your life for dishonoring him in that way?
        Why do we do that for our king?
        It really doesn’t matter what day of the week He rose from the dead. I have no problem with it if it was Sunday. But the fact remains that we should be so careful as to honor that day on the actual date every year, and not mix it in with the pagan fertility ritual of easter simply because “he rose on a sunday, so we honor it on a sunday.”

    • Andy Cook says:

      Okay, this is addressed to all of you who have responded so far and read my subsequent comments:
      Even if we build our doctrine on the possibility of Messiah being crucified in CE 30 (which is incontrovertible for our purposes) and if we agree that He did rise from the grave on the following sunday, there is still a major flaw in the logic used to support celebrating this act on Easter.

      All pagan origins aside, Passover is always on the Full moon. Always. This is because God’s calendar as prescribed in Exodus consists of months that follow the Moon’s rotation around the earth. So Passover is always on the Full moon in the Hewbrew month of Nisan (Nisan 15 is the actual date). When is easter celebrated? The first sunday, after the first full moon after the spring equinox (this date, no matter which calendar is used, changes from year to year, just as any celebration would that is specific to a week day, rather than the date, it’s just simple inevitability).

      Regardless of what day Messiah was resurrected, which of you celebrates their birthday on the second tuesday of every March (or whatever day of the week it was in a particular week of the month)? My birthday is not the Second thursday in March of every year, but it is March 8. I certainly don’t hold that my birthday is the 2nd thursday after the full moon. That would cause it to change dates wildly every year. Sure, it would coincide sometimes, but if the actual purpose behind easter is to recognize the day that our Savior brought Himself back to life from being dead, why do we so carelessly approximate the date or day? Who in their right mind would throw a party in honor of the coronation of a King a full 3 days before or after the actual date due to being on the wrong calendar? Wouldn’t that king end your life for dishonoring him in that way?
      Why do we do that for our king?
      It really doesn’t matter what day of the week He rose from the dead. I have no problem with it if it was Sunday. But the fact remains that we should be so careful as to honor that day on the actual date every year, and not mix it in with the pagan fertility ritual of easter simply because “he rose on a sunday, so we honor it on a sunday.”

      • Tony says:

        All of your arguments are irrational Andy.

        The church decided that the system for honoring the cornerstone of Christian faith would happen in this style a very long time ago, in other words, it is a Christian tradition now to celebrate Easter in this way, never a solid date, but a rotating date so that it falls on a Sunday.

        It actually makes more sense to do it that way than just picking the point that is pretty close to the same position in orbit every year.

        And all of these things are still a moot point in the end. The only thing that really matters is that the holiday is celebrated, and the word is spread that Jesus died for our sins and rose from the grave.

        He didn’t come down from Heaven to give us a couple holidays that he planned out on a calender with his disciples, he came down to give us a place in Heaven by dying for our sins. Arguing about which day we should celebrate it is ridiculous, you should be celebrating it every day of your life.

        And since the day doesn’t matter at all, if it happens to coincide with a pagan holiday, then great. Jesus can conquer people’s hearts and souls and their false holidays too. If you got anymore pagan holidays that haven’t been covered by a Christian one, let us know, we’ll come up with some more reasons to worship Jesus and put them on those days.

        • Andy Cook says:

          All of them are irrational? Okay, I’ll give you that. Anything you need to justify your own actions.

          Actually, the fact that the “church” decided it means it is actually a Catholic tradition. The “church” that existed during the time you seem to be indicating wasn’t really a governing body that made decisions for everything like that. Plus, there’s nothing in the Bible that backs up the celebrating of easter, so in short, you’re being more legalistic about it than you could even accuse me of being: You’re holding up man-made traditions over those which the Bible commands.

          Why does it make sense to pick a day that changes every year over one that is set in stone? Would it make more sense to celebrate your birthday on a set weekday during the month of your birth? Maybe for the purpose of socially getting together to celebrate it or whatnot, but you still hold that the actual event took place on a specified date, and that makes more sense than trying to pick a fluctuating day of the week.

          Again, why is it important that the “holiday” is celebrated? Where is it prescribed? Who are you to say that your manmade tradition will do more to spread the message of Salvation than the ways which God himself instructs? Aren’t God’s ways much better than ours? (1 Kings 11:31; Prov. 8:32; Isa. 55:8-9)

          No, He didn’t come to give us new holidays. What’s more: He didn’t come to undo the already long-standing holidays that God commanded to be kept for eternity (see Matthew 5:17-20; pretty sure it says He didn’t come to abolish anything, and that anyone who breaks even the least of the commandments is least in the kingdom, therefore presenting our need for Him. Nothing changed.) I’m also certain that not only did He not change or remove anything from the existing scriptures, He upheld the very Torah you reject, and part of that includes a command to not worship God in the ways that the pagans worship their gods: Deut. 12:31-32 “You shall not worship the Lord your God in that way, for every abominable thing that the Lord hates they have done for their gods, for they even burn their sons and their daughters in the fire to their gods. Everything that I command you, you shall be careful to do. You shall not add to it or take from it.”

          Again, no, the day doesn’t matter, but there’s a major difference between a Biblical Appointed time coinciding with a pagan holiday (which is probably bound to happen at some point due to the different calendars) and choosing a pagan holiday on which to worship God. Read that Deuteronomy passage again. Chew on that for a while and tell me if you still think that God is okay with us recycling fertility celebrations in His name.

      • Dan says:

        Andy,

        You bring up a good criticism that most Christians today have never thought of, or maybe even some choose to ignore. The association of traditional Catholic holidays with their pagan roots is widespread, and I have not understood why so many Christians that do not associate with Catholicism at all, still choose to celebrate these Catholic holidays that are purely based on Catholic tradition and not Scripture. What Scripture does reveal to us, is that on the night Jesus was betrayed, as they partook of the passover feast He instructed His disciples “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me. In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” (Luke 22, 1 Cor 11). Jesus told His disciples to remember Him when they partake of the Lords Supper (Communion). In Acts 20:7 we see the early church doing this on the first day of the week, “On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread…”. I, for one, agree with you that the mainstream “religious holidays” are not based on Scripture, and would even argue, that to truly abide by Jesus’s instructions in this matter, we should remember not seek our annual days (i.e. Christmas and Easter); but instead focus on honoring Him each time we take of the Lord’s Supper, reflecting to the sacrifice he paid for our sins which allows God’s judgment to pass over us the same way it did for the Hebrew nation. We should follow the early church’s example to gather for the breaking of bread each first day of the week. (Also see 1 Cor 16 for further evidence of the early church meeting regularly on the first day of the week).

        Andy, out of curiosity, and if you don’t mind sharing, what is your religious background? You clearly know the Old Law well. I would suggest one item from your posts that stuck out to me, is you indicated your practice of continuing to celebrate the Old Law holy days (feasts, etc), and gave Jesus’s declaration that He came to fulfill the Law. While I do not dispute any of that, I would also refer you to Romans 14:1-6, where Paul addresses the confusion the early church had in whether to continue observing the Jewish feasts and other practices (i.e. eating of meats, many other verses elsewhere discuss circumcision). Namely, vs 5: “One person esteems one day as better than another, while another esteems all days alike. Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind.” We don’t see this much today, as I would say most Christians in America come from a non-Jewish heritage and “esteem all days alike”. Further, I would refer you to Romans 7, especially vs 6: “6 But now we are released from the law, having died to that which held us captive, so that we serve in the new way of the Spirit and not in the old way of the written code.” And also Colossians 2:8-15, where Paul says that Christ removed the legal demands of the old law, “having nailed it to the Cross”. All of that to say, while I have no argument against recognizing the traditional Jewish holidays and their meaning, Christ fulfilled the law and thus released us from the demands of living by the Old Law, now living by a Law of Faith and obedient service to God.

        Thanks, enjoyed hearing your perspective.

        Dan

        • Andy Cook says:

          Point well made, and one that I’ve made many times: why take part in Catholic holidays if you aren’t catholic, regardless of whether they have their roots in paganism or not?

          One point in your first paragraph that I will disagree with: the instruction Messiah gave to “do this in remembrance of me” was not an instruction to eat/drink a weekly/biweekly/monthly cracker and cup o’ grape juice/wine. It was a Passover Seder that He was sharing with His disciples that night, and He was saying, “when you do this,” the “this” in this case being the Passover dinner as instructed in Exodus 12, “do it in remembrance of Me.” In other words, “when you observe the Passover, remember the sacrifice that I will make/made for you.” Even Paul admonishes us to “celebrate the feast” (1 Corinthians 5:6-8). You could argue “He’s talking about the feast of unleavened bread.” Okay, so do it then.

          With all respect, the reference in Acts 20 to the first day of the week doesn’t give any actual indication that they regularly met on the first day of the week. Yes, it says “on the first day of the week when the disciples came together to break bread” but where is the implication that that was when they regularly met together? Also, if you’re carefully reading it, you’ll notice the mention of the lamps in the upper room where they were gathered. Wouldn’t it have to be after dark for there to be lamps? So were they meeting on sunday night or saturday on into the evening? As you may know, the hebrew day begins at sundown the prior day, so if it was the first day of the week and the lamps were lit, why is it unrealistic to presume they were meeting on the sabbath and stayed together into the next day? I’m not saying let’s get dogmatic about it, but my understanding is just as reasonable as yours, is it not? I really urge you to read a post I wrote about this very topic, in which I examine some of the classic arguments made for a first day Sabbath versus a 7th day Sabbath and why it’s unreasonable to claim that Paul did so, and that makes it okay. You can read it by going here: http://thinkin2014.wordpress.com/2014/01/20/traditions-of-men-why-the-church-is-more-guilty-of-legalism-than-hebrew-roots-christians/

          For some additional readings on the Sabbath, I urge you to read some of the following article: http://www.torahresource.com/EnglishArticles/Rm%2014%20&%20Sabbath.pdf

          Interesting you ask that. I was raised in a non-denominational, immersion-baptizing, juice & cracker eating, tongues speaking, (questionable) prophecy spouting, charismatic christian church. Attended the same church for the first 21 years of my life. When I was 18 & 19 I started seeking answers to questions about the commands given in the Torah; started wondering why it was that everybody in my church always frowned on certain practices that are condemned in the old testament (tattoos, piercings, etc.) and not even mentioned in the new testament; wondered why it was that God was always made out as an unchanging, eternal God, but yet somehow He changed His mind about certain things, mostly because the Pastor said so. A big issue for me was when I, in an act of sheer rebellion against my parents, went out and got a tattoo, and everybody in the church, my parents included, was shocked and disgusted to think that I could do something like that to my “temple.” I searched and searched and couldn’t find anywhere in the “relevant” scriptures about tattoos and the like, so I became skeptical that my church really knew anything about the God they claimed to worship especially if they claim that this “unchanging God” changed His mind about certain things in one verse, but not the items in the immediately preceding and following verses. I met my wife later that year. She was what you might call “Hebrew roots.” We believe in only one way to salvation through Messiah Yeshua, and that God is truly unchanging, and when He says something is eternal, it’s eternal. I started studying more into what that means and what it looks like to truly walk in the footsteps of our Messiah and King, and found that in all honesty, when you try to emulate a Jewish Messiah, your life and actions start to look Jewish. I don’t believe in the conversion of a person in any direction (jew to christianity or vice versa) and I don’t believe that any of the Torah was done away with. When Paul makes mention of the “law” in his letters, he is referring to the law of sin, which is that if we sin, we are condemned. We are no longer under that law.
          In fact, we will be rewarded for our good works that are a fruit of our faith in Messiah Yeshua. (See the book of James)

          Messiah is God; nothing He spoke while sojourning here on earth was anything new or original. He Himself said that He did not come to do anything apart from the Father’s will, and 1 John 2 tells us “3 By this we know that we have come to know Him, if we keep His commandments. 4 The one who says, “I have come to know Him,” and does not keep His commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him; 5 but whoever keeps His word, in him the love of God has truly been perfected. By this we know that we are in Him: 6 the one who says he abides in Him ought himself to walk in the same manner as He walked.” If we truly believe that Jesus is God, and that He did not come to do anything apart from the will of the Father, then the commandments of Messiah are the very same as the commandments of God (i.e. the Torah, Law, etc.) What’s more, if we truly believe that Messiah was sinless — that is that he walked blameless before God and obeyed every Torah commandment which applied to Him as a Jewish Man from the tribe of Judah living in Israel — then if we strive to walk in the ways in which He walked, we ought to be searching the Torah for how to do that. Luckily, His blood covers us when we fail to do so.

          This article (same as above) also addresses the issue of “one regarding one day above another” mentioned in Romans 14 (http://www.torahresource.com/EnglishArticles/Rm%2014%20&%20Sabbath.pdf). In addition, this article is a really good digest of Acts 15 and the Jerusalem council (http://www.torahresource.com/EnglishArticles/Acts%2015.pdf)

          Yes, Messiah fulfilled the Torah, but that doesn’t mean we don’t have to do it just cuz He did. My father got a college degree, that doesnt mean I don’t have to. He said “I did not come to abolish (greek: καταλύω, “to dissolve, disunite
          (what has been joined together), to destroy, demolish, to overthrow i.e. render vain, deprive of success, bring to naught”) but to fulfill (greek: πληρόω, “to make full, to fill up, to cause to abound, to furnish or supply liberally, abound, to render full, i.e. to complete
          to fill to the top: so that nothing shall be wanting to full measure, fill to the brim, to consummate, to make complete in every particular, to render perfect
          to carry through to the end, to accomplish, carry out”)
          The word translated as “fulfill” means more appropriately, “to fill up, to cause to abound,” and not so much “to complete.” This makes sense when you compare it to the word used for “abolish.” You could paraphrase it this way:
          “I did not come to disunite, dissolve, destroy, or overthrow the Law and the Prophets, but I came to fill them up, to give them meaning, to cause them to abound,” (which makes sense when you consider part of the Messianic prophecies included bringing the Torah to the Nations).

          Click to access Fulfill%20in%20Matt%205.17.pdf

          In closing, if we are no longer responsible for any of the Torah commandments, for whatever New testament reasons you want to supply, how do you recon with Revelation 14? Specifically v. 12: “Here is the perseverance of the saints who keep the commandments of God and their faith in Jesus.” Hard to take that any other way. It doesn’t say “law of Christ,” not that it should matter since they are one.

          Peace

        • Dan H. says:

          Andy,

          Thanks for the post. I have not had many discussions with followers of Messianic Judaism and appreciate hearing your perspective. It seems that the bigger point of discussion here is how we should treat the Mosaic Law today. Should we continue to live by the Law and observe it’s commandments, or have we been released from the commandments of the Law and given a New Law to live by.

          From my perspective, Scripture (including the New Testament writings) are clear on this:

          God foretold that He would make a “new covenant”, not one like the covenant given to their fathers written on stone (i.e. Mosaic Law) but in contrast “one written on their hearts”:

          Jeremiah 31:31-34, “Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah, not like the covenant that I made with their fathers on the day when I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt, my covenant that they broke, though I was their husband, declares the Lord. But this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, declares the Lord: I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts. And I will be their God, and they shall be my people. And no longer shall each one teach his neighbor and each his brother, saying, ‘Know the Lord,’ for they shall all know me, from the least of them to the greatest, declares the Lord. For I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.”

          Romans 7:1-6, (especially vs 6)
          “Or do you not know, brothers—for I am speaking to those who know the law—that the law is binding on a person only as long as he lives? 2 For a married woman is bound by law to her husband while he lives, but if her husband dies she is released from the law of marriage. 3 Accordingly, she will be called an adulteress if she lives with another man while her husband is alive. But if her husband dies, she is free from that law, and if she marries another man she is not an adulteress. 4 Likewise, my brothers, you also have died to the law through the body of Christ, so that you may belong to another, to him who has been raised from the dead, in order that we may bear fruit for God. 5 For while we were living in the flesh, our sinful passions, aroused by the law, were at work in our members to bear fruit for death. 6 But now we are released from the law, having died to that which held us captive, so that we serve in the new way of the Spirit and not in the old way of the written code.”

          Hebrews 8:4-7, 13 (especially vs 7 & 13)
          4 Now if he were on earth, he would not be a priest at all, since there are priests who offer gifts according to the law. 5 They serve a copy and shadow of the heavenly things. For when Moses was about to erect the tent, he was instructed by God, saying, “See that you make everything according to the pattern that was shown you on the mountain.” 6 But as it is, Christ has obtained a ministry that is as much more excellent than the old as the covenant he mediates is better, since it is enacted on better promises. 7 For if that first covenant had been faultless, there would have been no occasion to look for a second.
          13 In speaking of a new covenant, he makes the first one obsolete. And what is becoming obsolete and growing old is ready to vanish away.

          Hebrews 7 (especially vs 11-12, 18-19, 22) – especially vs 12 & 18-19
          11 Now if perfection had been attainable through the Levitical priesthood (for under it the people received the law), what further need would there have been for another priest to arise after the order of Melchizedek, rather than one named after the order of Aaron? 12 For when there is a change in the priesthood, there is necessary a change in the law as well.
          18 For on the one hand, a former commandment is set aside because of its weakness and uselessness 19 (for the law made nothing perfect); but on the other hand, a better hope is introduced, through which we draw near to God.
          22 This makes Jesus the guarantor of a better covenant.

          Ephesians 2:12-16 ( especially vs 15
          12 remember that you were at that time separated from Christ, alienated from the commonwealth of Israel and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world. 13 But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ. 14 For he himself is our peace, who has made us both one and has broken down in his flesh the dividing wall of hostility 15 by abolishing the law of commandments expressed in ordinances, that he might create in himself one new man in place of the two, so making peace, 16 and might reconcile us both to God in one body through the cross, thereby killing the hostility.

          Colossians 2:14-16
          By canceling the record of debt that stood against us with its legal demands. This he set aside, nailing it to the cross. He disarmed the rulers and authorities and put them to open shame, by triumphing over them in him. Therefore let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink, or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a Sabbath.

          Gal 3:24 tells us that the Law was a “guardian until Christ came” (3:24), that “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law” (3:13), and “when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, 5 to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.”

          ———————————–

          You brought up Matt 5, my perspective on it is that Christ is saying He came to fulfill the Law and Prophets…or think of it this way, God has foretold of the coming kingdom throughout the prophets (see Jeremiah 31, Ezekiel 36, Zechariah 2, Isaiah 2, Daniel 2, Joel 2, among others), and told of the coming prophet like Moses, whom God will put His words in his mouth (Deuteronomy 18:18)…what set Moses apart from the Old Testament prophets that followed was that Moses issued a new Law for God’s people…likewise, the coming prophet would be like Moses in that he would give a new law to God’s people. Jesus’s message that He didn’t come to destroy the Law but fulfill it, is Him saying that He was the One prophesied about who would come to give a new law and establish God’s new covenant. If we want to think that the Old Law would never been done away with, then why does the Law & Prophets itself declare that God will bring a new covenant forward not like the previous one?

          Christ gave the new covenant through words spoken through the Apostles, which was given to those who through faith would obey Jesus commandments and instructions given through the Apostles. In 2 Corinthians 3:6, Paul says how God has made them “ministers of a new covenant”. He then goes on contrasting the new covenant to the old covenant:

          7 Now if the ministry of death, carved in letters on stone, came with such glory that the Israelites could not gaze at Moses’ face because of its glory, which was being brought to an end, 8 will not the ministry of the Spirit have even more glory? 9 For if there was glory in the ministry of condemnation, the ministry of righteousness must far exceed it in glory. 10 Indeed, in this case, what once had glory has come to have no glory at all, because of the glory that surpasses it. 11 For if what was being brought to an end came with glory, much more will what is permanent have glory.

          Paul is referring to Exodus 33/34 when Moses comes down with the commandments (written on stone) with his face shining the glory of God; and says the new covenant has “even more glory”. Then he says in vs 10 that what once had glory (the Old Law) has “come to have no glory at all, because of the glory that surpasses it”.

          I hope that my point is clear, because it is very important for us to realize that God’s new covenant is far better than the old, and so much of the New Testament writings are focused on the message of forgetting the old and being transformed into the new. While the Old Law served a very important purpose of showing us God’s Holiness, it was told that it was just a “pattern” of things to come (See Ex 25:40 & Heb 8:5, 9:23, 10:1). The Law was a tutor & guardian (Gal 3), but now it’s purpose has been fulfilled and surpassed by the Law given by Christ.

          For Revelation 14:12 – It seems as if you assume that “the commands of God” is strictly meaning the Old Law? I would argue that Christ, both personally, and through the Apostles teaching, gave commandments of God as foretold by Jesus having the role of law-giver like Moses. If we are to appeal to God through faith (the new covenant) as Galatians 3 dictates, we appeal to God through keeping the commandments of that new covenant as taught by Jesus and His Apostles.

          Sorry for the lengthy response, but I love God’s word and discussing the complete plan God initiated from the beginning of time to bring all peoples to Him through His beloved Son, and the gospel professed by His apostles (Ephesians 1:3-14).

          Dan H.

  20. Jared says:

    I like this post. But I have to disagree with one thing. Early Catholicism was not known for its peaceful nature.

    • Matt(Not Walsh) says:

      Catholicism, yes, you are right, but Christianity before it became Catholic was peaceful. It was entirely made up of the eleven disciples of Jesus, and a little later, Saul(who became Paul after being visited by Jesus). They then had disciples of their own who spread the gospel in caves, or basements. That’s where the Christian fish symbol came from. It was the way to identify each other in a world where they were being hunted and killed just for being Christian. One would draw one line of the fish and the other person would draw the other half. That way they knew they were in the presence of a fellow believer.

  21. Dawn says:

    Happy Easter. Christ our Lord is risen today. Hallelujah

  22. nancy says:

    Christianity is not for wimps! Thank you for your words.

  23. carrie96 says:

    http://easter.mormon.org/?gclid=CLig8L3i3b0CFVFp7Aodfn8AKw&cid=99112886&s_kwcid=AL!3737!3!44549511015!p!!g!!because%20of%20him&ef_id=Uw1ACwAAAMCOTGh9:20140413152356:s

    This is a great video that really shows the true meaning of easter for all Christians. I know that my redemer lives.

    Thank you for your words and testimony.

  24. carrie96 says:

    http://easter.mormon.org/?gclid=CLig8L3i3b0CFVFp7Aodfn8AKw&cid=99112886&s_kwcid=AL!3737!3!44549511015!p!!g!!because%20of%20him&ef_id=Uw1ACwAAAMCOTGh9:20140413152356:s

    This is a great video that really shows the true meaning of easter for all Christians.
    I know that my redemer lives.

    Thank you for your words and testimony.

  25. Paige says:

    I believe this too. Thanks for wording it so beautifully.

  26. Leigh Owens says:

    Amen, Matt! Happy Easter to you and yours!

  27. Logan says:

    “Consider for a moment the significance of the Resurrection in resolving once and for all the true identity of Jesus of Nazareth and the great philosophical contests and questions of life. If Jesus was in fact literally resurrected, it necessarily follows that He is a divine being. No mere mortal has the power in himself to come to life again after dying. Because He was resurrected, Jesus cannot have been only a carpenter, a teacher, a rabbi, or a prophet. Because He was resurrected, Jesus had to have been a God, even the Only Begotten Son of the Father.

    Therefore, what He taught is true; God cannot lie.25

    Therefore, He was the Creator of the earth, as He said.26

    Therefore, heaven and hell are real, as He taught.27

    Therefore, there is a world of spirits, which He visited after His death.28

    Therefore, He will come again, as the angels said,29 and “reign personally upon the earth.”30

    Therefore, there is a resurrection and a final judgment for all.31

    Given the reality of the Resurrection of Christ, doubts about the omnipotence, omniscience, and benevolence of God the Father—who gave His Only Begotten Son for the redemption of the world—are groundless. Doubts about the meaning and purpose of life are unfounded. Jesus Christ is in fact the only name or way by which salvation can come to mankind. The grace of Christ is real, affording both forgiveness and cleansing to the repentant sinner. Faith truly is more than imagination or psychological invention. There is ultimate and universal truth, and there are objective and unchanging moral standards, as taught by Him.”

    My favorite part of Elder D. Todd Christofferson’s talk from LDS General Conference a few weeks ago. I thought it would resonate with you. Happy Easter Matt! He is risen!

  28. Happy Easter 4 u guys… 🙂

  29. Pingback: April 21, 2014 Grumpy Daily Headlines | Grumpy Opinions

  30. firnhyde says:

    Best post I’ve seen on this blog, Matt. So true, and very beautiful.

  31. John R. Smith says:

    Amen, thank you.

  32. brandihill07 says:

    Amen! I serve a risen King, the King of Kings who died for me so that I may live! Thanks for the inspiring read & Happy Resurrection Day to you!

  33. Ramona Haynes says:

    Beautiful! Thank you! It is what I believe as well!

  34. johncwright2001 says:

    “Christianity has the potential of being more universal once we get the supernatural stuff out of the way and focus on what Jesus really meant, as he was quite wise in his teachings.”

    Christianity has the potential of being more universal once we get the Christ out of the way, and concentrate on recycling, women’s right to choose, gay marriage and voting for Obama, which was what Jesus really meant.

    The supernatural stuff is extra. I mean, it was not the fact that Christ came back from the dead that caused the disciples to pay attention to His word, it was the fact that He told them men should not tell lies and children should respect their parents, a dramatic new doctrine which NO ONE EVER IN ALL OF TIME had even once ever mentioned, Except for Confucius, Lao Tzu, Buddha, Socrates, Moses, Vyasa, the god-kings of Egypt and the Sybil of Rome, of course. And the bards of the Celts. And the shamans of the American Indians. And the sages of India. And everyone else. But aside from that, the message of Christ, “Be Nice!” is entirely and completely unique.

    • Matt(Not Walsh) says:

      Christianity without Christ is like a car without an engine. I also don’t recall anywhere where Jesus said to vote for Obama. Must have missed that in Sunday school class. The rest of what you said is universal truths. Here’s the difference. You are talking about men. Mostly philosophers, a few people that religions were founded around. The difference is the supernatural events which prove that Jesus was more than just a man. He was the living embodiment of God himself. How many other people have been witnessed at a wedding turning a jug full of water into wine? How many other people have taken blind men, and made them see again? How many other people have taken someone who had lived 60+ years laying on a mat near a spring because their legs don’t work, and given them ability to walk for the first time ever in their lives? How many other people have walked up to a tomb and said, “Rise and come out.” and the occupant of the tomb did? How many other people were witnessed walking on water? I can go on and on, but I’ll leave it with one more thing. How many of those other people went to die on a cross for your sins and mine?

      • Joseph Lee says:

        Matt(Not Walsh), if the “vote Obama” comment didn’t tip you off, johncwright2001’s comment was meant in jest. I mean, “vote Obama” was meant to be really obvious. Now if your comment was also meant in a similar light, I apologize for not getting the “joke”.

        My comment is not meant as a joke even though reading it, it seems kind of funny in a “the writer seems kind of ‘off'” way: trying not to sound harsh while pointing this out is difficult for me. XD

  35. TC says:

    Amen! Happy Resurrection Day, Easter. The promise that drives. I may borrow this in part for sermon challenge fodder. Dig your blog brother. Thank you.

  36. helldoesntownme says:

    Thank you. Have a blessed Easter!
    Loved As If

  37. Linda Mock says:

    Thank you!

  38. Roy says:

    Yeah, yeah, whatever! It’s amazing what some people are willing to believe. The crazier the ideas, the more people are willing to believe them. There are some good teachings in religion, but there is also too much stuff that is way out there and unnecessary, and unrealistic. Common sense is all you need.

    • Matt(Not Walsh) says:

      That’s where you’re wrong. You need more than common sense. You need Jesus. I believe in the Bible and what it says. In there it talks about faith. Faith is not seeing and yet believing. I believe because I’ve seen miracles happen. I’ve seen angels, I’ve seen demons. I’ve been touched by angels while lying in a hospital bed. Common sense says that that can’t happen, faith says it can. Believe on the lord Jesus Christ and you will be saved. For God so loved the world that he sent his one and only son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish, but have eternal life. Sounds to me like you need a little more faith and a little less “common sense”.

    • Sator says:

      Common sense was what converted me and many others, Roy.

    • TheKnowerseeker says:

      Common sense without God leads to Objectivism or even Satanism.

      • Roy says:

        Does it really lead to Satanism? That’s absurd. Just because I don’t follow a religion doesn’t mean I’m a reckless human and don’t have any morals. I treat people with respect, I don’t steal, I don’t have a desire to kill anyone, etc. Yes it might be hard to believe, but it is possible to live a normal decent life without practicing a religion or believing in a god. Common sense has served me well.

  39. Amy says:

    I love this post. Happy Easter to you, Matt, and your family!

  40. TheKnowerseeker says:

    Christians, please, let’s stop calling the day “Easter”. Easter is a pagan goddess, an idol. Let’s all call it Resurrection Day instead.

  41. Jonathan says:

    This is beautiful Matt. Thank you so much for this. It made my day. I just recently started following you a few weeks ago. I can’t believe I haven’t heard of you until now.

  42. Natalie says:

    Love getting your emails, love reading your blogs, love your FB page ! Would that there are more strong men like you Matt, Godly men, who are not afraid, ashamed, or abusive, but instead receive your strength & courage from the word of our Lord. May God continue to bless you and your family.

  43. Mom of Five says:

    Reblogged this on Life Together and commented:
    I couldn’t have said it any better.

  44. Pingback: An exercise in questioning Christians | Christianity Simplified

  45. Strewth says:

    To see a real crucifixion to the death, travel to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, where the penalty is not only in the statutes but actually used, even as late as the 2000’s. Since 2013, however, the crucifixion had taken place only after beheading, so you may be too late. You may have to travel to Sudan instead.

  46. Syndog says:

    Wow, Matt. I’m only a recent subscriber to your blog, but I have to say I am duly and unabashedly impressed. Well done.

  47. Perfectly stated!! 🙂

Comments are closed.