Who needs Santa when you’ve got Jesus?

santa

Santa Claus.

He is a legend, a myth, a fable.

I hope this isn’t breaking news.

Now, when a myth is passed off as fact, it becomes something else: a lie. In many households, Santa is a lie. He’s fun, he’s jolly, he owns gravity-defying reindeer and enslaves thousands of tiny elves in his icy dungeon; he’s overweight (probably because he eats billions of cookies every Christmas), and he isn’t familiar with laws against trespassing and home invasion. He’s also a lie.

He isn’t just a “story.” Stories — fictional stories — have an ending. They are contained in books and television shows and movies. We do not weave an elaborate web of deceit to convince our children that Snow White really exists, or that Mickey is an accurate portrayal of how mice really behave. If they ask us about the geographical location of Neverland, we’ll tell them Neverland is just imaginary.

We like for our kids to have imaginations, but Santa has nothing to do with imagination. When you imagine, you conceive a thing that isn’t. With Santa, a child is simply duped into believing a thing that isn’t. Santa is a mythology that we force feed down their throats, and then go to great lengths to preserve. Again, it’s called “lying,” not “imagination building.”

Lie: a false statement made with deliberate intent to deceive; an intentional untruth; a falsehood.

He’s an entertaining, fanciful, merry ol’ lie — but he’s a lie all the same.

I’m often informed that Santa isn’t a “lie,” per se, because he’s “just for fun.”

Well, he might be, but the opposite of “lie” isn’t fun — it’s “truth.”

Is Santa true? No. Do you know he isn’t true? Yes. So what do you call it when you attempt to convince someone of an untruth? Fun? OK, but it’s a fun… what? A fun lie.

Look, my own mom and dad “did the Santa thing.” They’re great parents and fantastic people, so I’m not making any judgments about parents who “do Santa.” You could be perfectly wonderful, loving, and caring, and still participate in this holiday fraud.

But I think it might be time to reconsider the practice.

Yes, it’s a longstanding tradition, but not all traditions are worth continuing. Take, for example, Santa’s evil cousin: the Bogeyman. In many cultures, parents used to tell their kids that the Bogeyman would come to their room at night and eat them alive if they didn’t behave. Depending on the country, sometimes he would kidnap you and make you his slave, and other times he would just cannibalize you upfront. There have been many variations — and, hey, do your own thing with it, have fun — but they all shared the common “do what I say or a mythical beast will brutalize you in unspeakable ways” message.

There’s a lot that past generations got right about parenting. This isn’t one of them.

Certainly, Santa Claus is far more pleasant than the Bogeyman, but I submit that they are both relics of a time when it was acceptable to coerce your children with mystical scare tactics.

Maybe we should move on.

I don’t intend to write a lengthy refutation of every pro-Santa argument; I’m already devoting enough space as it is to this gluttonous stalker. I’d like to specifically address only one point on the Santa platform. I hear it all the time, and it goes like this: Santa makes Christmas magical. If you take Santa away from your kid, you’ve taken all the fun out of the holiday.

Please, carry on with the Kris Kringle schtick for whatever reason you like, but not this one. Any reason but this reason. Santa makes Christmas magical? SANTA?

This is what I hate about the guy. He’s a Christmas-stealing glory hog. He’s a diva; everything has to be about him, doesn’t it?

We invite Santa to Jesus Christ’s birthday party, he brings his stupid elves and a bag full of cheap toys, next thing you know it’s his party. If he leaves, apparently the party’s over. How can we have fun without magic?

Well, you know, there’s still Jesus. The Messiah. The Son of Man. Jesus Christ is better than magical. He offers something far greater than toys. He doesn’t have flying deer, but he has armies of angels. He doesn’t live in a cabin up in the North Pole, but He does live in a dimension that transcends time and space, and He invites us to join Him there in unending bliss. He doesn’t visit every house on Christmas night, but He’s always present, everywhere, all the time, because He is an omniscient deity.

In other words, Jesus is WAY cooler than Santa. This is a message that is, I think, tragically lost on many children. Let’s be honest: Christmas ain’t big enough for the both of them. Santa, the fun fictional character? Sure. Santa, the silly game of make believe? Yeah, he can join the festivities without overshadowing the Man of the Hour. But Santa, the actual real person who gives out toys made by elves? THAT Santa, being a man of considerable girth, tends to crowd Jesus out of the hearts of many kids. Yeah, Jesus is the Messiah, but Santa has TOYS. Who comes out on top in that scenario when you’re 4 years old?

Some children are so full of natural grace that even a pudgy mystical gift giver can’t distract them from Jesus. But normal kids — kids that are closer to how I was as a child — will find their allegiances split. I can’t believe that I’m the first 5 year old who impatiently sat through church on Christmas Eve, ignoring all of the stuff about nativities and wise men; entirely engrossed in visions of reindeer, elves, Santa Claus, and Game Boys (it was the 90’s, kids).

Why do we need to spruce up the Birth of God by adding some nonsense about a fat guy in a red suit? God, the Ultimate Power in the universe, sent His Son to Earth. He was conceived inside a woman’s womb and was born into this world in the same manner that all humans are born. He walked among us, performed miracles, healed the sick, raised the dead. He was murdered and then came back from the grave, and He now sits on His throne, at the right hand of God the Father. On Christmas, we celebrate His arrival, and the beginning of the epic journey that ended with Christ’s triumph over sin and death. He watches over us at all hours, every day, all year, for our whole lives, and offers us healing, comfort, and salvation. His angelic armies protect us as they battle the forces of evil, and He wants us all to join in that fight; a fight that will be won, once and for all, at the End of Time, when He returns in glory.

Now, tell me how Santa makes THAT more magical?

Santa, the Christmas Lie, is but a whimper and a sigh in the light of Jesus, the Christmas Truth. He can’t bring anything to the table that Jesus hasn’t already provided.

So do Santa if you want to do Santa, but you don’t need him to make Christmas magical.

Christmas is already more than magical — it’s supernatural.

**********

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@MattWalshRadio

 

 

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740 Responses to Who needs Santa when you’ve got Jesus?

  1. Kay says:

    I just find is sad that you write a post that is pretty much a killjoy type of posts. If parents want to partake in the Santa thing, that is their choice. It’s not a lie so much as playing pretend with your kids. If you go to Disney, would you tell your kid who is all excited to see Micky Mouse that he isn’t real.. and it’s really just a person in a suit? Of course not. Why? Because it’s nice to let your kids believe. It’s not a lie. It’s just playing make believe. I enjoyed that my mother taught me about Santa. When I found out he wasn’t real, I wasn’t mad. I was happy she partook in something that even though wasn’t true, was fun to pretend it was just for me.

    The challenge here is that you are under the pressure of making your kids believe in faith. Which is no more or less different then trying to get them to believe in Santa. You can’t prove for a fact that God is real any more then you can that Santa was. So if you pretend Santa was and they find out he isn’t, then they will question other things you have told them. Like God. Think about that. You have to defend the being of something that you can no more or less prove to be any more real as Santa.

    Christmas has changed into a Holiday celebrated by all types of people who may or may not believe in Jesus. They are no less guilty for adopting some of these things, then Christians are for adopted the pagan parts of the holidays into Christmas.

    • Emily says:

      “…would you tell your kid who is all excited to see Micky Mouse that he isn’t real.. and it’s really just a person in a suit? Of course not. Why? Because it’s nice to let your kids believe”
      Do you even have children? Even my two year old is not dumb enough to think that the costumed Mickey Mouse is real. Of COURSE they know it’s a man in a suit. And it’s fine and fun to pretend, but you are seriously underestimating the intelligence of children with that statement.
      My children have active imaginations. The other day they were playing “Frozen Tiger Daddies,” whatever that was (I have no idea). And I didn’t tell them “Don’t be silly boys, there is no such thing as a Frozen Tiger Daddy. I laughed at their game and encouraged them to keep enjoying their playtime. But part of my job as a parent is to help my children differentiate between make-believe and reality. Lying to them about Christmas doesn’t help me accomplish that. Santa isn’t evil – my boys even enjoy “playing” Santa sometimes, but they know it’s a game. And trust me, it doesn’t make them any less thrilled about Christmas morning. For the record, I grew up not believing either, but Christmas was (and probably still is) my favourite day of the year.

    • Jmack says:

      Actually, when we went to Disney my mom made sure we understood that everything around us was fake and only Jesus was real. As a child I appreciated that because I knew she wasn’t lying to me about anything or perpetuating the lie that was trying to be sold to me.

    • Marc says:

      “It’s not a lie so much as playing pretend with your kids.” Well, Kay, THAT is a lie. When you play pretend with your kids, they know you’re pretending. Parents do not say, “Let’s pretend Santa is real.” They LIE to their children and TELL them that Santa is real. If you can’t see the difference, then you are blind.

  2. ~bella g. says:

    Replace ‘Santa’ with ‘Jesus’ and you get the same result….a lie! Thanks, Scrooge!

  3. “Certainly, Santa Claus is far more pleasant than the Bogeyman, but I submit that they are both relics of a time when it was acceptable to coerce your children with mystical scare tactics.

    Maybe we should move on.”

    LOL, I feel the same way about your absurd religion! “Be good and believe in Jesus, accept him as your personal savior or go to hell”? Same scare tactics, same level of evidence. Listen, I don’t really care if people feel the need to believe in this Christian mythology but I think if we are willing to tolerate your absurdities you could show a little more tolerance toward other people’s absurdities. OH WAIT, your religion doesn’t believe in tolerance….

    • emilynvail says:

      I appreciate the tolerant and accepting tone of this comment. Er… never mind.

    • Mindy says:

      It’s only a scare tactic if it’s not true.

      • Walter White says:

        So, it’s a scare tactic. Jesus ain’t real, and ain’t gonna come and punish me for anything. Your religion is not just false but dangerously insane ideas. It’s followers are horrible people. All of them. I have never met a “good” christian.

        • Jewel4778 says:

          You’re right. Christians aren’t good. We’re horrible sinners just like you. The only difference we repent and know our sins are forgiven by the grace of God.

  4. Vernalmom says:

    Santa is not a lie. It is based on Saint Nicholas who is legit. My kid believed in Santa, heck I still believe in Santa because it’s not a person but a spirit of giving. Which by the way is a Christ like spirit! We do Santa, we know it’s about Jesus and we understand that Santa is just a fun way of sharing a Christ like love and attitude with our families and friends. I am Santa, my son loves that he can be Santa now. My parents enjoyed being Santa as well. We are all real. The spirit of St. Nick is real. My husband passed away 2 years ago and we still give gifts in his name as well. Doe sthat take away from Christ? Is it a lie because he isn’t physically here giving us gifts? Nope, it’s just a simple way of carrying on his love for us and the season. My seminary teacher taught us that Santa is not bad, off of a real man who had such a Christ like spirit that he was named a saint. When my son became old enough to understand, I explained to him that it’s not that Santa is not real, it’s that we continue to give through him, so we all become Santa. Just like gifts were brought to Jesus. It’s out of love, and christ like hope and faith. We also have a box under the tree, wrapped in white that we add pieces of paper in it. On each piece of paper is our gift to Christ. When he do something kind, stand up for what is right, and try our hardest, we write it down and give it as a gift to Christ. I don’t know what tainted the spirit of Santa for you but I hope you still are able to feel that beautiful spirit of giving, and love during this Christmas season. I believe in Christ and I believe he loves us. I believe he also loves when we share with other’s not just gifts, but time, and patience. I believe that Christ would only love St. Nick and the giving spirit he brings each year. I do hope you have a Merry Christmas.

  5. Jana says:

    I have thought about this and will continue to. I know it sounds bad but it isn’t the lie that makes me want to stop doing Santa, although I’m not a big fan of it, but it does seem that there is not enough room for 2. I have 3 small kids and they talk about santa constantly and Christ gets all but forgotten. I have been trying to think of ways to keep both but it seems I am trying to sneek Christ into Santas holiday and that is totally backwards. So THANK YOU for giving me more motivation to put the spotlight on the right person even if that means getting rid of the jolly fat one.

  6. eliza says:

    Love, love, love this. You so describe how I feel about it! We don’t do Santa and honestly I can not imagine adding him in to this already hectic crazy time of year. Like you said, there just isn’t time for both Jesus and Santa and if you are focused on one the other one fades into the background. And I am so so so glad that I can honestly say I’ve never told my kids a lie. And in most cases, it’s not just telling them a lie- it’s doing very elaborate crazy things to convince them the lie is true. I just don’t understand it. My kids get just as excited about Christmas as every other kid and no magic is lost by not having Santa. Most little kids are terrified of him anyway. And my older children are at the age where their friends are finding out, and quite honestly most of them feel pretty dumb that they believed and confused that their parents told them he was real. If you can’t do Christmas without him then by all means, continue on. I’m glad we don’t.

  7. Shaunna Sanders says:

    I’m with you on this one. I don’t ever remember believing in Santa Claus, but Christmas has still been a magical holiday for me, and my favorite one. I don’t talk about Santa with my own kids, and when they ask, I tell them the truth. But they still love Christmas. It’s of little concern to me if other people celebrate Christ’s birth through a surrogate because they don’t stop me from celebrating the holiday the way i want to. Sometimes, though, it’s the Christians with whom I clash the most on this issue.

    What bothers me is when my friends and associates who are Christian cast me as the bad guy when I tell my children the truth. Seriously, when my five year old son was in children’s Sunday School and Santa was brought up (I have no idea why they would even talk about Santa Claus during Sunday School, but…), he shared the truth with them. Or, at least, started to. He was quickly hushed, and I was later reproached for not having warned him that other parents want their kids to believe in Santa and it is not okay for him to tell the truth. Well, I want my kids to believe in God, but I don’t follow my kids around warning all their friends and associates not to tell them otherwise. And I know that my children will encounter myriads of people throughout their lives who do not have the same religious beliefs they do. That’s okay.

    For Muslims or Buddhists or atheists to focus on Santa Claus more than Christ during Christmas (although why do they celebrat Christmas at all?) is none of my business. But for Christians…? When we run into strangers in the community who ask my children what they want Santa to bring them for Christmas, they say Santa Claus isn’t real. And I follow it up with letting them know that we believe in Christ, not Santa. I can’t think of anyone who has ever had a response to that statement.

  8. Katie D says:

    My take on this isn’t the same, but here are my thoughts on making Christ a part of your Christmas Celebration: http://www.ruminatingroom.com/2013/12/an-invitation.html.

  9. Rebecca Aske says:

    When my kids were little we watched all the Santa Christmas shows and talked about Santa coming etc…at the same time we were doing this I would say, “But Santa isn’t real he is pretend. Isn’t it fun to pretend. Santa stories are so fun to pretend!” And never made a big deal about it. We would go to Christmas Eve service or have discussions while decorating the tree and talk about the Real Jesus and the Nativity Christmas story that was true. Again not harping, just celebrating and experiencing the holiday…both the real and the pretend parts. (I think your tone is a bit militant. We don’t have to lie…but we don’t have to get rid of Santa either – relax and celebrate what is real and have fun with the pretend – one doesn’t have to take away from the other…because they are different from one another).

  10. Rebecca Aske says:

    When my kids were little we watched all the Santa Christmas shows and talked about Santa coming etc…at the same time we were doing this I would say, “But Santa isn’t real he is pretend. Isn’t it fun to pretend. Santa stories are so fun to pretend!” And never made a big deal about it. We would go to Christmas Eve service or have discussions while decorating the tree and talk about the Real Jesus and the Nativity Christmas story that was true. Again not harping, just celebrating and experiencing the holiday…both the real and the pretend parts. (I think your tone is a bit militant. We don’t have to lie…but we don’t have to get rid of Santa either – relax and celebrate what is real and have fun with the pretend – one doesn’t have to take away from the other…because they are different from one another).

  11. Joe Olachea says:

    I don’t think the myth of Santa needs to be thrown out, but as soon as kids stop believing in Santa Claus the truth can be told. http://godsfoolishness.blogspot.com/2013/12/janitors-shepherds-and-wise-men.html

  12. Jmack says:

    I heard on the radio this week an advertisement for a local church’s Christmas service, they advertised that part of the service would be Santa telling the real story of Christmas (about Jesus) and all I could think about was those poor children that will one day realize Santa isn’t real and will they then question everything he “told” them including who Jesus is? And the church is supporting it?!?!?!?!?!?! Boggles my mind…

  13. Rebecca says:

    Why are we picking on poor Santa? The Elf on the Shelf is MUCH creepier, in my humble opinion.

  14. Pingback: Santa Claus and the Importance of Imagination | Usufract

  15. Celeste says:

    Far as I’m concerned, Jesus is just as much of a myth. Besides, Christmas in December was usurped from pagan religions. I celebrate a secular Christmas, and Santa is welcome in our home.

    • Mindy says:

      Jesus is a myth? He is a historical figure! Just because you don’t want Him to exist doesn’t change that He came. By that logic, I submit that you are a myth.

      • Celeste says:

        Perhaps I worded that incorrectly, I apologize. Santa, “St.Nicolas” was a historical figure who grew into a mythology. I view Jesus the same way-sure, he was probably a real human being, but the mythology just grew from there. If someone showed up *now* and claimed they were Jesus returned to earth, and did some cool magic tricks, would you believe it was him? How would you know? What would be your proof, because you would probably need proof that it was him, otherwise, you are taking it on complete faith that what he claimed was true. And since it’s a matter of faith, how come you require no proof that someone is Jesus before you believe in him? I submit that all religions are invented by mankind, and perhaps there is truth in some of them, I don’t know. But I personally don’t believe there is a deity out there, and that mankind is on our own. Besides, the Christian god is supposedly omnipotent, yet look at all the suffering in this world. If that’s the kind of god he/she is, then I don’t *want* to worship such a creature, even if such a thing *did* exist. And since I don’t believe in the concept of hell, or the devil, then I’m not too worried about the consequences of non-belief. To each their own though. I’m good with celebrating Christmas with Santa.

        • ambiclaus says:

          Your idea of what God should exist for is a presupposition that he exits to prevent the human experience which, let’s be real, often times, entails an enormous amount of pain and suffering. I’ve heard that same argument from Richard Dawkins and find it strange that atheists expect that, if we were created by a deity, we wouldn’t have cancer or any ailments. How do people come up with these expectations of what a god should be? I’m amused by it. It seems very simplistic and naive.

          Oh, and I celebrate Christmas with Santa and Christ. We know that we’re celebrating on the wrong date for Christ’s birthday anyway, but it’s fun to join in a cultural tradition that encourages generosity and love for our neighbors. We enjoy the story of St. Nicholas also. He was believed to be a champion for Christians and that is something to celebrate!

  16. Anon says:

    I think it’s funny how you say you won’t pass judgment on people who “do Santa” but then proceed to pass judgment on those who “do Santa.”

    If you don’t “do Santa” with your own kids, that’s fine. Why do you care, though, if other families do? To each his own.

    • Jamie says:

      “If you don’t “do Santa” with your own kids, that’s fine. Why do you care, though, if other families do? To each his own” ~~That makes the most sense. Seriously, who doesn’t know children who have faith in Christ and grew up with Santa at Christmas, and others who grew up with nothing but bible and walked away? There are many articles showing that Jesus could have been born in fall thus making that a lie as well, possibly? fact is Jesus loves you either way, lets drop the legalism and stop searching hearts like a man, search them as God would

  17. Me and my siblings grew up believing in Santa, and my oldest daughter also grew up believing in Santa, but my baby now who is four I dare to bring her up in the myth of Santa. I do not condemn anyone who let their children believe in Santa, but I have learned better. I rather live here on earth as if there is a God in Heaven, then to die and go to heaven and see that there really is a God. Children need to know the truth about what Christmas really mean, and it is not about getting but it is about giving. Giving the truth gift and that gift is Love, As I said I do not condemn anyone who wants to bring their children up believing in there is a Santa, but for me and my child we will believe in God.

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  21. Judy says:

    U know I must be the only old person here, I believed in Santa but I was also told about the real meaning of Christmas was Christ. When I found out there was not a Santa I was not mad at my parents for not telling me. I did not wonder if they were telling me a lie about Jesus, I believed then and believe now. I loved the thought of Santa and so did my kids and my grandkids who are grown and they are no worse for the wear of believing in Santa. I think it is fun to make believe still for the kids… I don’t believe some make a big deal about make believe, Halloween, Harry Potter, Wizard of Oz, Disneyworld, now come on, all the make believe things, what is wrong with make believe it beats all these crazy video games with killing and stuff…

    • Jamie says:

      I was thinking much the same, but I am in my 40’s so not an age thing. I believed in Santa, and don’t have any idea when that changed. I called my mom after reading this and asked if we ever had this talk because I don’t remember ever caring. She said as I grew older, a school mate or cousin probably told me but I never asked. I still believe in God, never assumed they were hand in hand, and have had eight children, six who never questioned or were upset, just eventually figured it out.

  22. MJ says:

    I have just found your blog, Matt, and am LOVING what I have read so far. After reading this post I had to comment. . . One of my dear friends and one of the wisest women I know (she is in her late 70’s) has this to say about the subject: Materialism is the religion of America and Santa is the God whom we worship. He comes down from the sky every year to give us the things we ask him for. We bring our children to pay him homage at the place of worship we call the Mall, where we can meet him and ask him for the things we need, and then give a sacrifice at the alters therein to receive those things, aka pay money for stuff at the stores in the mall. We try to be good because he is always watching, etc. etc. etc.

    This all came up because I asked her a couple of years ago what her opinion is on Santa and Christmas. I have three young children and was feeling funny about spending so much time teaching them about Santa instead of Jesus. She gave the above analogy, and then told me her opinion became cemented that Santa could be a “fun” part of Christmas but not passed off as truth when, while her own children were young and she was teaching a Sunday school class to a group of 8 or 9 year-olds, one girl told her, “When I found out Santa wasn’t real, I thought Jesus must not be real either.” She decided then to be a place of truth for her children, where they could ask and be told the truth as she understood it without reserve. Wise woman. I am trying to model my life in that way.

    Thank you for your blog. You are spreading truths. In my religion, we believe that truth is “things as they really are.” I appreciate your posts about things as they really are. Truth makes people mad. It always has and always will. Nice job standing for truth!

    • ambiclaus says:

      Wonderful comment. My grandpa’s trust for his parents was obliterated when he was told Santa wasn’t real (the elf/fairy tale). He lost much of his trust for his parents because he didn’t know, at that point, what was fact and fiction that came from their mouths. As you’ve pointed out, a child can lose their faith in Jesus Christ if they are being lied to about something else. Obviously, children are not all the same. Some will be fine if they find out Santa isn’t a flying elf, etc., but some might have their trust and faith in their parents’ truthfulness destroyed. To me, having my child trust me and what I have to teach him about Christ is far more important than an annual fantasy game. It’s not worth the risk!

  23. bwebbjr says:

    Reblogged this on Believing IN Christ Jesus through ALL things and commented:
    Who needs Santa when you’ve got Jesus?

  24. Marc says:

    Matt, you wrote: “Look, my own mom and dad ‘did the Santa thing.’ They’re great parents and fantastic people, so I’m not making any judgments about parents who ‘do Santa.’ You could be perfectly wonderful, loving, and caring, and still participate in this holiday fraud.”

    You just vitiated everything you said about the lie of Santa. When parents lie about Santa, it is deliberate, premeditated, habitual, unrepentant deception — against their own children. We are not talking about someone who falls on the spur of the moment into the sin of lying and repents of and hates that sin. We are talking about those who carefully plan the sin and love walking in the sin. The Bible calls these people liars. And no liar will inherit the kingdom of heaven.

    http://www.outsidethecamp.org/santa.htm

  25. Ben says:

    Absolutely love this blog. On our own, our family has come to the same conclusion about Santa. It’s a lie. I’m not afraid to confront other parents with this fact. In our home, Santa has NOTHING to do with Christmas, period. My little 3 year old is excited about Jesus and throwing him a birthday party though 🙂

    Not “doing” Santa doesn’t mean throwing out all tradition, it can mean creating new traditions or dredging up old traditions that align with our faith more than a materialistic jolly magical man.

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  27. Marc says:

    Here’s a Christmas Song I just wrote to the tune of “Silver Bells.”
    Sing along! – Marc

    There’s a lie comes
    ‘Round at Christmas
    Parents say that it’s cute
    “It is just harmless fun for the children”

    But this white lie
    Is a black lie
    Undermining the truth
    It’s the vile lie that Santa is real

    Parents’ lies
    Willful lies
    All to deceive little children
    Liars all
    Watch them fall
    Soon it will be Judgment Day

    They say Santa
    Sees and knows all
    Knows who’s good and who’s bad
    Then he visits all homes in one evening

    He’s omniscient
    Omnipresent
    Is the standard of right
    He’s the god of all children who hear

    Parents’ lies
    Willful lies
    All to deceive little children
    Liars all
    Watch them fall
    Soon it will be Judgment Day

    Parents say that
    God is real, but
    He’s just like Santa Claus
    He’s a myth of their parents’ devising

    Don’t expect the
    Child of liars
    To believe them when they
    Say that there is a real Jesus Christ

    Parents’ lies
    Willful lies
    All to deceive little children
    Liars all
    Watch them fall
    Soon it will be Judgment Day

    Children grow up
    Then they know their
    Parents lied to their face
    Then all trust has completely eroded

    “Why should I think
    Anything you
    Say is true anymore?”
    And in all those households you will hear

    “My Dad lied
    My Mom lied
    I’ve been deceived by my parents”
    Liars all
    Watch them fall
    Soon it will be Judgment Day

  28. Jennifer Kaufman says:

    Well written. I wrote similarly recently, and love the distinction you drew between Santa the fantasy and Santa the “real, live person”. I actually took a different approach to the topic than you did, but we landed in the same place: the story is complete, beautiful, redeeming enough without anything added.

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  30. Meg says:

    Hmmm…. Both St. Nicholas and Jesus were real people whose lives inspired stories and traditions in Western culture. How can you say–using your own logic–that one is real and the other is not? The Jesus story has no end either.

    • Walter White says:

      Saint Nicholas was an actual human being. There is not one shred of evidence that Jesus ever existed. So, Santa is real, at least the story version, and Jesus is not.

  31. Pingback: Why You Should Lay Off the "Santa Claus is Real" Stuff (Because He's Not) - Christ and Pop Culture

  32. mathanna says:

    Matt – hope life after radio is treating you well. Even though you’re not doing it anymore, hope it’s okay to still consider you a fellow broadcaster.

    Just coming across this article – yes, the Santa story is a myth. And the reason my children were told about the “story,” but never believed that a jolly man in red was going to come down our chimney to bring good little boys and girls gifts. (And the coal thing for the others)

    Truth does matter. Amen Matt.

    But as is often discussed on this blog, so does consistency. You can’t say one falsehood is wrong while condoning another as okay.

    The “truth” about Christmas matters too. And the truth is that, outside of man’s traditions (like Santa), Jesus doesn’t have anything to do with “Christmas.”

    His birth is real.

    The angels announcing His birth are real.

    The “no room in the inn” is most likely “no room in Joseph’s relative’s/friend’s upper (guest) room that he stayed at because it was the culture to visit family and friends/an insult not to, so they had to make do with the lower portion of the house where the animals come in at night and there was a manger (trough) in the floor.” But something like it did happen.

    But Jesus being born on Dec 25th? The use of all the pagan symbols to celebrate it (ones that were used to celebrate pagan rituals before they were combined with the birth of Jesus to make a bigger celebration)?

    Myth.

    More of man’s tradition. Which Jesus was pretty clear about us not following instead of the commands of God. Like observing the Feast of Tabernacles, an appointed time God actually instructed “His people” (defined by scripture as those who know and walk with Jesus) to observe. A biblical feast that has not been fulfilled yet. And may very well be when Jesus was born.

    But the Bible doesn’t tell us. Maybe because the date was irrelevant. Maybe God knew that we would make it about “a day” instead of what it was about.

    Guess what? We came up with a day anyway.

    Rather than keeping Christ in Christmas, man put Christ in Christmas. And even most of the activities surrounding what we do have little to do with Him anyway.

    Tree. Chipmunks. Fruitcake.

    We can tell stories about how they “represent” something Jesus-y. But that’s just more myth-telling.

    IMHO Christians actually do as much, if not more, damage to the real story by promoting it as we do in promoting Santa. Because it’s not the real story.

    And the reason my children, while knowing about the “story” of Christmas, actually know the truth of Jesus’ birth.

    Compared to Matt, this isn’t much of a rant. But like Matt, I agree with being as consistent and truthful as possible.

    Matt, thanks for letting me take up a little of your blog space. Peace.

  33. akelas123 says:

    I enjoy reading your blog; it’s my new favorite thing to do. I have yet to find an article–or even a single sentence in an
    article–which I disagree with.

    As a little kid I never believed in Santa, and I never felt compromised. It helped me to appreciate my parents much more.

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